CONFLICT RESOLUTION

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10 MINUTE OFFICIATING p3

Day 3 of our new coaching habit.  Are you keeping up?  If not, catch up.  It’s only 10 minutes to go over a few definitions to make us all better.

LET’S TOSS IT UP FOR p3!


RULE 4- SESSION 3

SECTION 11 CONTINUOUS MOTION
ART. 1 . . . Continuous motion applies to a try or tap for field goals and
free throws, but it has no significance unless there is a foul by any
defensive player during the interval which begins when the habitual
throwing movement starts a try or with the touching on a tap and ends when
the ball is clearly in flight.
ART. 2 . . . If an opponent fouls after a player has started a try for goal,
he/she is permitted to complete the customary arm movement, and if
pivoting or stepping when fouled, may complete the usual foot or body
movement in any activity while holding the ball. These privileges are
granted only when the usual throwing motion has started before the foul
occurs and before the ball is in flight.
ART. 3 . . . Continuous motion does not apply if a teammate fouls after a
player has started a try for a goal and before the ball is in flight. The ball
becomes dead immediately.

 

SECTION 12 CONTROL, PLAYER AND TEAM
ART. 1 . . . A player is in control of the ball when he/she is holding or –
dribbling a live ball. There is no player control when, during a jump ball, a
jumper catches the ball prior to the ball touching the floor or a non-jumper,
or during an interrupted dribble.
ART. 2 . . . A team is in control of the ball:
a. When a player of the team is in control.
b. While a live ball is being passed among teammates.
c. During an interrupted dribble.
d. When a player of the team has disposal of the ball for a throw-in.
ART. 3 . . . Team control continues until:
a. The ball is in flight during a try or tap for goal.
b. An opponent secures control.
c. The ball becomes dead.
ART. 4 . . . While the ball remains live a loose ball always remains in
control of the team whose player last had control, unless it is a try or tap
for goal.
ART. 5 . . . Team control does not exist during a jump ball or the touching
of a rebound, but is re-established when a player secures control.
ART. 6 . . . Neither team control nor player control exists during a dead
ball, a jump ball or when the ball is in flight during a try or tap for goal.

 

SECTION 13 COURT AREAS
ART. 1 . . . A team’s frontcourt consists of that part of the court between its
end line and the nearer edge of the division line, including its basket and
the inbounds part of the backboard.
ART. 2 . . . A team’s backcourt consists of the rest of the court, including
the entire division line and the opponent’s basket and inbounds part of the –
opponent’s backboard.

 

SECTION 14 DISQUALIFIED PLAYER
ART. 1 . . . A disqualified player is one who is barred from further
participation in the game because of having committed his/her fifth foul
(personal and technical), two technical fouls or a flagrant foul.
ART. 2 . . . A player is officially disqualified and becomes bench
personnel when the coach is notified by an official.

 

SECTION 15 DRIBBLE
ART. 1 . . . A dribble is ball movement caused by a player in control who
bats (intentionally strikes the ball with the hand(s)) or pushes the ball to the
floor once or several times. It is not a part of a dribble when the ball
touches a player’s own backboard.
ART. 2 . . . During a dribble the ball may be batted into the air provided it
is permitted to strike the floor before the ball is touched again with the
hand(s).
ART. 3 . . . The dribble begins by pushing, throwing or batting the ball to
the floor before the pivot foot is lifted.
ART. 4 . . . The dribble ends when:
a. The dribbler catches or causes the ball to come to rest in one or
both hands.
b. The dribbler palms/carries the ball by allowing it to come to rest in
one or both hands.
c. The dribbler simultaneously touches the ball with both hands.
d. The ball touches or is touched by an opponent and causes the
dribbler to lose control.
e. The ball becomes dead.
ART. 5 . . . An interrupted dribble occurs when the ball is loose after –
deflecting off the dribbler or after it momentarily gets away from the
dribbler. There is no player control during an interrupted dribble.
ART. 6 . . . During an interrupted dribble:
a. A closely guarded count shall not be started or shall be terminated.
b. A player-control foul cannot be committed, but a team-control foul
still may be committed.
c. A time-out request shall not be granted.
d. Out-of-bounds violation does not apply on the player involved in
the interrupted dribble.

 

GAME MANAGEMENT LESSON 2

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In part 2 we will discuss the importance of CONCENTRATION and how it’s the focal point that directly affects your CONFIDENCE, SELF-CONTROL and COMMON SENSE

 

 

CONCENTRATION

Concentration in any sports performance is usually the catalyst when it comes to psychological skills because on some degree, it controls all the others.

 

FORMS OF DISTRACTIONS

Thinking about a missed call and about making other mistakes.

Fatigue, tired

Noise from other game related staff or situations

Coach talking to you during live ball

Partner’s missed calls or errors

Players, fans behavior

Work and private life issues

 

HAVE YOU TAKEN YOUR 10 MINUTES TO REVIEW YOUR RULE BOOK?

 

10 MINUTE OFFICIATING p2

Let’s continue with our daily 10 minute new habit with NFHS Rule 4 Definitions #5-#10

TIP 101:

As simple as some of these may seem, they can always we the biggest mistakes we make on the court.  NOTHING is TOO SIMPLE during “High Intensity” situations.

ALWAYS BE PREPARED!


RULE 4- SESSION 2

SECTION 5 BASKET, CHOICE
ART. 1 . . . A team’s own basket is the one into which its players try to
throw or tap the ball.
ART. 2 . . . Each team’s basket for practice before the game and for the
first half shall be the one farther from its team bench.
ART. 3 . . . The teams shall change baskets for the second half.
ART. 4 . . . If by mistake the officials permit a team to go the wrong –
direction, when discovered all points scored, fouls committed, and time
consumed shall count as if each team had gone the proper direction. Play
shall resume with each team going the proper direction based on bench
location.

 

SECTION 6 BASKET INTERFERENCE-

*KEY DEFINITION- Low Frequency/ High Risk
Basket interference occurs when a player:
ART. 1 . . . Touches the ball or any part of the basket (including the net)
while the ball is on or within either basket.
ART. 2 . . . Touches the ball while any part of the ball is within the
imaginary cylinder which has the basket ring as its lower base.
EXCEPTION: In Arts. 1 or 2, if a player has his/her hand legally in
contact with the ball, it is not a violation if such contact with the ball
continues after it enters the imaginary cylinder or if in such action, the
player touches the basket. Dunking or stuffing is legal and is not basket
interference.
ART. 3 . . . Touches the ball outside the cylinder while reaching through the
basket from below.
ART. 4 . . . Pulls down a movable ring so that it contacts the ball before the
ring returns to its original position.

 

SECTION 7 BLOCKING, CHARGING-

*KEY DEFINITION- High Frequency/ Low Risk
ART. 1 . . . Blocking is illegal personal contact which impedes the
progress of an opponent with or without the ball.
ART. 2 . . . Charging is illegal personal contact caused by pushing or
moving into an opponent’s torso.
a. A player who is moving with the ball is required to stop or change
direction to avoid contact if a defensive player has obtained a legal
guarding position in his/her path.
b. If a guard has obtained a legal guarding position, the player with
the ball must get his/her head and shoulders past the torso of the
defensive player. If contact occurs on the torso of the defensive
player, the dribbler is responsible for the contact.
c. There must be reasonable space between two defensive players or
a defensive player and a boundary line to allow the dribbler to
continue in his/her path. If there is less than 3 feet of space, the
dribbler has the greater responsibility for the contact.
d. The player with the ball may not push the torso of the guard to gain
an advantage to pass, shoot or dribble

 

SECTION 8 BONUS FREE THROW
ART. 1 . . . A bonus free throw is the second free throw awarded for a –
common foul (except a player-control or team-control foul) as follows:
a. Beginning with a team’s seventh foul in each half and for the eighth
and ninth foul, the bonus is awarded only if the first free throw is
successful.
b. Beginning with a team’s 10th foul in each half, two free throws are
awarded whether or not the first free throw is successful.
NOTE: Rule 2-10-1 a, b are applied if a merited free throw is not
awarded or an unmerited free throw is awarded.
ART. 2 . . . Player-control, team-control and technical fouls are counted as
team fouls to reach the bonus. When a technical foul is also charged
indirectly to the head coach, it counts only as one team foul.

 

SECTION 9 BOUNDARY LINES
ART. 1 . . . Boundary lines of the court consist of end lines and sidelines.
ART. 2 . . . The inside edges of these lines define the inbounds and out-ofbounds
areas.

 

SECTION 10 CLOSELY GUARDED-

*KEY DEFINITION- High Frequency/ Low Risk
A closely guarded situation occurs when a player in control of the ball in
his/her team’s frontcourt, is continuously guarded by any opponent who is
within six feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball. The
distance shall be measured from the forward foot/feet of the defender to the
forward foot/feet of the ball handler. A closely guarded count shall be
terminated when the offensive player in control of the ball gets his/her head
and shoulders past the defensive player.

 

SERIES: GAME MANAGEMENT

Game management is one of the most important factors which has direct impact on the success of your game.  In this series we will try and provide with some points you can share with your groups in order to enhance this part of your game.  If you have any questions, please post them below.  Enjoy… RM #71

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GAME MANAGEMENT LESSON 1

 

 

  • There will always be conflict/ disagreements between people involved in a game.
  • How well you handle these situations at an early stage will have a direct impact on preventing them from escalating.
  • Your degree of game management skills will play a huge role in your acceptance by coaches & peers & your ability to be a leader on the court.
  • The most successful people in officiating and in life have one common characteristic:

THE ABILITY TO HANDLE/MANAGE PEOPLE IN A RESPECTFUL MANNER.

Stay Tuned in for more on this topic in next few days!

 

HAVE YOU TAKEN YOUR 10 MINUTES TO REVIEW YOUR RULE BOOK?